Walking around Wells and Ebbor Gorge

I needed a bit of fresh air this weekend, so decided on this stroll around Wells, the smallest city in England, and Ebbor gorge. With its links to some poetry greats. Samuel Taylor Coleridge was in part inspired by Ebbor Gorge when writing Kubla Khan. And after climbing down this short narrow passage I can see the links.

Wells
Wells, a stroll through the city

The Cathedral, and Bishops Palace were silent this morning, the cold keeps most people in on a Sunday Morning so I had the place to myself.

Cathedral
Cathedral
Wells Cathedral
Wells Cathedral

The architecture and details around the square are fascinating, unfortunately a Sunday morning is not the time for a peek into the cathedral.

Details
Details

There was a fine mist around the moat and the clear water looked ready to freeze, but the crisp white snowdrops are starting to come out, welcome sight in the early winter.

The Bishops Palace
The Bishops Palace
The Bishops Palace, moat
The Bishops Palace, moat

The Bishop must have been paranoid, building himself a palace to keep out the riff-raff.

Snowdrops
Snowdrops

This is a walk of two very distinct halves, This first part skirts the edge of Wells, around to the west side where it strikes North towards the Mendips and into some pretty Combes. After the past weeks rain though it proved a slippery muddy and wet place to go. The combe, a narrow steep-sided valley has a stream wandering down the middle, spreading and collecting in the hollows.

Old Lime Kiln
Old Lime Kiln
Interesting Fungus
Interesting Fungus, Judas or Jelly Ear.
Bindle Combe
Bindle Combe
Badger
Badger
Not Sure About this
Not Sure About this, distorted
Caves
Caves, as well as Wookey Hole and Cheddar, there are many smaller caves dotting the Mendip Hills.

All over the Mendips, as well as the wildlife and the wild country, there are the caves that abound in the limestone hills. The most notable being Cheddar caves and Wookey Hole.

Deer Tracks
Deer Tracks

The joy of mud, at least the tracks show well. Lots of animals choose to use human tracks to move about when we are not about.

Signs of man
Signs of man
A fine spot for lunch
A fine spot for lunch

After climbing up to the high point on the walk, I decided to stop for lunch on Pen hill near the Mendip TV mast. Its colder out in the open so it was a quick stop before heading across the fields past Tumulus and farms.

Mendip Mast
Mendip Mast in low cloud
A magnificent view...
A magnificent view...

The views as described in the route guide are amazing, I hope so! I’d hate to be missing it.

Ebbor Gorge
Ebbor Gorge, on the run in.
In a primeval landscape
In a primeval landscape, as the gap narrows and steepens.

Ebbor Gorge, the walls close in and the smooth limestone rocks glisten with the water running through the cut. The walls are high and you clamber down to come out on the face of the cliff.

Narrow paths
Narrow paths
Limestone cliffs
Limestone cliffs

Once you head down from the gorge in to Wookey Village, it’s an easy run back to Wells on the West Mendip Way. I had a small camera crisis at this point, The battery gave up. So there is a lack for the finish. over Arthur’s Point above the quarry via Lime Kiln Lane, then into the houses and footpaths between Peoples gardens as I meandered back into Wells. The rain held off, although it was cold and damp all day It was a pleasant trundle across the Mendip hills around Wells.

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7 thoughts on “Walking around Wells and Ebbor Gorge”

    1. So much of what is around us, we miss in the day to day. I’ve tried over the last few years to change that, to stop looking always at the destination. And to watch the world as I travel. It has been so much more satisfying, and I have been lucky to be able to find and visit these places.

      Jim

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  1. First, I am adding everything in this post to my bucket list.

    Second, these pictures are spectacular and I enjoyed every single one. Thank you for sharing them. πŸ™‚

    Third, I miss England. Thanks for letting me live vicariously through your blog. πŸ˜€

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    1. I second C.B. Wentworth’s reply! Although I never lived in England, I’ve been there and have every intention of going back. These pictures make my mouth water. I live in Arizona, USA, and I am green with envy. It is beautiful here in its own way but my heart belongs over the ocean. πŸ™‚

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