A walk through the world between places

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Woods, Line Drawing.

In The Woods

In The Woods

Picture taken last year on the Mendips, played with in Lightroom and using Luminance HDR. I like the way this has turned out.


Green-wood Diffraction

I see you at this the critical angle,
that slight bending of the light
as it passes around you.

I watch the light embrace your shape,
at the boundary layer light shatters
as it passes through the gap

created by our proximity,
this is where wavelength is a factor.
Interference patterns of light

and dark emerge, spreading
into the space between us.
Highs and lows multiply in the air,

the angles merge, refraction bigger
than the angle of incidence and light
travels on unable to change medium.

All we are left with are circles of light and dark,
rainbow shadows and light pooling in the air.


Spring is on the way, the days are getting longer, green shoots and new life.

Hotel Terminus

Hotel Terminus

Hotel Terminus

Images to think on, work to be done. A life to be lived.

Hotel Terminus.

Coffee at the end of the line, by the woods where the buses stop.
Where the angels weep for the death of a man long forgotten.
The history of a place in fading curtains and chipped cups.

We’ll always be here, the watching few, watching the visitors
walking past. Not caring who comes or goes. Le Patron knows
when we want another, money is tight and we have all day.

Time changes the world even if we don’t see it changing,
the patois, the hair and the skin, the colour of the sky.
I know the history, from this place to a bed for the night,

but I lost it all one year a while before and now I wait,
I talk to them all of course, Tout le client, pourquoi pas,
why wouldn’t I? I am after all this time, one of them.

I just got left behind that’s all, something happened one day
and I got a little out of time. I’m dislocated and can’t catch up.

Weekend Wondering. Shakespeare and Love.

It’s the weekend, 6 Nations rugby, Valentines and a visit to Bristol to find some ideas for our forthcoming kitchen renewal. It’s nice to be nice to your partner, to be romantic. A shame so many people see this as the only time for romance, and the commercialism runs away with it because we spread ourselves so thin. Lets take some time and smile a bit more, say something nice to someone close. I love Shakespeare’s use of words, his ability to make it extraordinary.

The Man Himself

The Man Himself

Loves Labours Won

Loves Labours Won

Here are a couple of snippets to enjoy.

“All days are nights to see till I see thee,
And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.” Sonnet 43

“in black ink my love may still shine bright.” Sonnet 65

He has the words that still have impact. As we discovered when we went to Stratford and the RSC recently to watch Loves Labour Lost and Loves Labours Won. His Love poetry and verse is timeless.

The poetry cafe is this week at the Royal Hotel, Weston-super-Mare. I am writing sonnets, as the subject for this month, it’s slow going with work commitments but I am writing at least. Here is a fragment of my own I’m working on.


A Love Song.

A Love song is always
the sound of life with you.

Have a heart this week, be kind and remember, it’s nicer to smile at people.

Quote

Is It Enough?

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Enough Is Enough.”

Churchyard

Churchyard


Elders with memory hang heavy heads,
young, unknowing will beat their chests.
The words run dry and silence runs free,
it will fit any space.

The word that was required was unspoken,
silent space fills hearts with fear for what follows.
Death will walk for want of a word.

Lovers parted, wars started and the world turned.
Silence is uncaring and cries are lost in a generation.


Brecon Snow.

Snow on the Brecons.

Snow on the Brecons.

Brecon Snow.

The weather forecast settled about 5 days out and just got better as Sunday drew closer. So there it was, a trip to the Brecon Beacons, Pen y Fan, Corn Du and Cribyn, clear skies and settled snow. The road was a little icy but easily passable with care. Someone had trouble on a slope but made it and cleared off the road in the end, I seemed to be the only one with a shovel despite the predicted -1 temperature. Heading in from the South is my favourite approach, glimpses of the hills through the trees of the Taf Fechan forest, exiting into the steep-sided valley near the Neuadd reservoir the white peaks are unmistakable.

What lies ahead

What lies ahead

The cut in the side of the hill.  An entry to the ridge.

The cut in the side of the hill. An entry to the ridge.

After the lead in walk, you turn conclusively uphill, with the edge of the cliffs hiding the main event, if you look across the valley, the Roman road is easily spotted heading back to the start.

Looking out across the valley.

Looking out across the valley.

The weather stayed cold all day, as predicted. Which with the breeze made for a chilly start to the walk along the ridge. But with warm clothes, a beautiful clear blue sky and the sun making everything bright you couldn’t ask for a better day in Wales. I’ve been here in much worse. And this end is the quieter route in. Although I was passing and being passed, by a friendly bunch all like me, enjoying the chance to see the and around repainted white. It is when you clamber out of the cold wet gully you get to see the hills ahead. Glorious, shapely peaks.

The head of the valley, hidden for the moment.

The head of the valley, hidden for the moment.

Me, in the snow.

Me, in the snow.

Doesn't look so bad from up here.

Doesn’t look so bad from up here.

Final push.

Final push.

Looking back to the forest.

Looking back to the forest.

Looking South along the edge of the ridge.

Looking South along the edge of the ridge.

Heading onwards.  Corn Du Pen y Fan and Cribyn

Heading onwards. Corn Du Pen y Fan and Cribyn

Snowy scenery.

Snowy scenery.

Closer now.

Closer now.

As you get approach the main summit area, the ants resolve into people, lots of people who come from the North, this is a popular and easily accessible area. Luckily they tend to stay in quite a small area, so are easy to escape.

A hint of cloud in the background.

A hint of cloud in the background.

Nice clear views from here, bit windy though.

Nice clear views from here, bit windy though.

Nice cloud.

Nice cloud.

Some not so good cloud arriving.

Some not so good cloud arriving.

Walking in the snow, in this cold weather, changes everything around you. The sound is different, the way you walk, wading through a flattened landscape full of hidden pits. Dropping thigh deep from time to time adds a bit to a normal stroll. Crunching through the harder patches, or scuffing across shallow windblown areas bare and dark in comparison. Unfortunately, as we approached Corn Du, the cloud fell over us and visibility was reduced to twenty or so metres. With intermittent breaks to show snatches of what you are missing. Such is the way of high places, some days the cloud gives you a big hug. This is nice in some ways, privacy, quiet, thoughtful walking, just no wide open panoramas of South Wales from one of the best viewpoints in the country. The Brecons are a fantastic range, with drama that far exceeds their 880m summit.

Cornice along the edges.

Cornice along the edges.

As the cloud descends, we climb Corn Du.

As the cloud descends, we climb Corn Du.

A quick peek at Cribyn.

A quick peek at Cribyn.

After lunch on Corn Du, we fought the crowds at Pen y Fan, to get the picture. With me is a lad called Tom. We met in the car park, walked mostly together, chatting and strolling along. Always good to bump into people and see the who, why and where of someone you meet. Made for a change not to be travelling alone today.

Rime formation.

Rime formation.

Small but perfectly formed.

Small but perfectly formed.

People dodging the climb up Corn Du.

People dodging the climb up Corn Du.

Corn Du, cloudy but decidedly calm.

Corn Du, cloudy but decidedly calm.

Pen y Fan.  Nothing to see here, keep walking.

Pen y Fan. Nothing to see here, keep walking.

Just to prove I was there.

Just to prove I was there.

The descent from Pen y Fan, proved interesting. Many people, not having any sort of grip on their trainers (yes) or wearing boots with shallow lugs, decided to slide down the tracks. This resulted in the snow compacting and getting icier. The good side to this was the chance to buckle on my crampons and stroll with ease down slopes others were precariously dancing down. Bum slides, all fun and games until someone finds a rock, or a cliff. But there you go, each to his own. There’s a drop between Pen y Fan and Cribyn, and the cloud was staying close to make sure we didn’t get lost. Makes for some drama as you hear things and people pass by heard and unseen.

Cribyn sliding through the clouds.

Cribyn sliding through the clouds.

Fan y Big playing peek-a-boo.

Fan y Big playing peek-a-boo.

Looking back up Cribyn.

Looking back up Cribyn.

Looking for the setting sun.

Looking for the setting sun.

It was a good day out. Well worth the trip from home. plenty to see along the way, and plenty of snow, everyone we met was happy and friendly and many stopped for a brief chat about the hills, places to visit in the future and where they had travelled from today. The car park was emptying quickly when we arrived back, people trying to head out before the road froze over as night fell in the valley.

Driving home, listening to music and letting the world flow past. I picked up a coffee and as the snow was left behind I crossed the bridge back to England ready for another day. Have fun with your day and keep going forward, it will be worth it in the end.

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